While writing our page for low deposit brokers we got the idea to create this page – a page about low min trade brokers.

The difference between the two is simple – low deposits are simply the smallest amount brokers will accept from you (to fund your account). A low trade min is the smallest amount you can buy a contract or position for.

Chances are you’re interested in low min trades if you want or need the option to make small deposits. You might also be interested if you’re risk averse.

Whatever the case, you’ll find our top picks below.

Binary Options Brokers With Low Minimum Trades or Positions of $10 or Less

Here are the brokers we suggest you check out:

Keep in mind these are the bare minimums. Each trade type may have its own limits. You can read our reviews for more details.

Stuff Binary Options Traders Should Know

Below are some random tips low min traders will appreciate.

1. Practice good bankroll management.

It doesn’t matter if you want to trade part time, full time, seriously or just to gamble and have fun – you should practice good bankroll management.

But what is good bankroll management? There isn’t really a right or wrong way. It depends on a lot of variables.

Here’s my take on it.

I think professional handicappers use a good rule of thumb. Their approach is to never wager more than 5 percent of your bankroll on any one line or market, or $5 for every $100 in your bankroll.

That should be no problem if you can find a broker with both a low min deposit and low min trade. Otherwise, just do your best.

But this approach should help those even with the smallest bankrolls prolong the life of their bankroll.

If that’s too conservative an approach, then just ask yourself – how long do you want your money to last? The rest of the day? Until you get paid again? What?

Then just figure out how many trades you can/want to make and divide your bankroll that way.

Whatever the strategy you choose to use, the only absolute is you pick one and stick to it.

2. Pay Attention to Individual Trade Limits

Another thing you want to pay attention to are the trade limits of the types of options/contracts you want to buy.

For example – the minimum trade might be $20, but the minimum trade for a 60 second contract might only be $5.

Cheap, right? Not exactly.

If you’re making one trade right after the other you could be buying contracts every couple of minutes. This is unlike, say, a 30 or 60 minute option where the time between trades is much longer.

(Assuming you make one trade at a time, of course.)

You’re also likely to experience more variance over the span of 60 seconds compared to 60 minutes or even 24 hours.

That’s something you want to think about and pay attention to if you don’t have lots of money to spend. The cheapest option on paper isn’t always the truly cheapest option.

3. A Way to Get the Most Bang for Your Buck

One tip to make the most of your low min trades is to join a broker who offers a high payout (90+ percent) and/or a broker who offers some form of refund or cash back on your losses.

(We have a page that discusses all of this here.)

The higher your overall payout the less money you’re technically risking per trade.

For example, say you joined Markets World where you can make trades for as low as $1.

If you make a trade with a 78% return, you’re technically expected to get back $.78 for every $1 you spend.

You’re not really spending (or losing) $1 then, but instead $.22.

But if you join Cherry Trade instead where they offer up to 81% returns, you’re spending (or losing) $.03 less per trade. Each trade you make goes further, allowing you to make more trades in the long run.

(Note – This is not how it works on a trade-by-trade basis. When you lose you do lose the entire amount. This is only to point out the difference you can save/make when you choose a broker who offers a combination of higher payouts and refunds.)

The point – if you can find a broker who offers a combination of higher payouts and low min trades, your bankroll will go much farther.

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